A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, a stage adaptation with Traditional Christmas Music

Scrooge in Wreath.jpgThe Round Barn Theatre at Amish Acres holiday production of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, a stage adaptation with traditional Christmas musichas been expanded from 20 to 47 performances, beginning November 17th and running through December 31st, replacing Tis the Season: A Holiday Spectacular. A Christmas Carol has become a wonderful family yuletide tradition and the source of cherished memories.

The theatre has recently joined The Christmas Carol Network, an organization of theatre companies from around the world.  It brings their diverse talents and dedication together to assist hundreds of performing arts organizations and thousands of creative artists in collaboration to bring Dickens’ novella to each new generation on the live theatre stage.

In addition, a portion of the proceeds from ticket sales to A Christmas Carol will be donated to Riley Hospital for Children. Free tickets for young patients of Riley and their parents are being made available through the Joseph Stein Memorial Fund.

It is this collaboration, joining forces with The Christmas Carol Network and the partnership with Riley Hospital for Children that brought about the decision to expand on the number of shows for A Christmas Carol, bringing the full resources of The Round Barn Theatre together to concentrate its efforts on Dickens’ masterpiece alone for its holiday production.

Jeremy Littlejohn, Artistic Director, has returned to direct A Christmas Carol. “There are as many versions of A Christmas Carol as there are theatres producing the play,” said Littlejohn, “but through the Network, the script is literally taken from Dickens’ original tale and the traditional music is carefully selected to add layers of richness.” Many of the carols in the production are being returned to their historical roots by music director Travis Smith. “Silent Night” and “Ding Dong Merrily on High” were secular dance tunes from the 16th Century, and “Carol of the Bells” was an ancient pagan Ukrainian New Year’s magical chant. The carols are all brought together to confirm the universality of Dickens influence on western society.

Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol in 1843 during the Victorian era when the celebration of Christmas had become somber and many Christmas traditions forgotten. He was influenced by Washington Irving’s The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, which depicted the warm-hearted holiday festivities that he had experienced as a child. The story of Ebenezer Scrooge’s transformation after visits from Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come revived the holiday’s secular celebration. The popularity of the tale, which has never been out of print, paved the way for today’s more lighthearted and childlike fantasy of Christmas, including the greeting “Merry Christmas.” Perhaps no special greeting has ever been spoken as often. Dickens’ secular vision of the holiday now takes its place alongside the original Biblical story and introduced the family-centered festival of seasonal food and drink, dancing, games and generosity that now enriches the church centered observations of Christmas.

Dickens is further credited with saving London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children from financial crisis in 1858 by raising money through a series of lectures. Seventy one years later, the hospital received the rights from J. M. Barrie’s play Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up. When the copyright originally expired at the end of 1987, 50 years after Barrie's death, Parliament granted the hospital the right to collect royalties in perpetuity to benefit its patients.

In the spirit of this unique and unprecedented story of good deeds, The Round Barn Theatre will donate a portion of its proceeds from A Christmas Carol to the Riley Children’s Foundation. Riley Hospital for Children is named for James Whitcomb Riley, Indiana’s poet laureate, who was often seen in his Lockerby home pouring over verses of one of his 1,044 published poems, or immersed in a favorite Charles Dickens’ story by gaslight.

So, from the entire staff of Amish Acres and The Round Barn Theatre at Amish Acres, we say “Merry Christmas,” (a bit early) and we hope the spirit of Christmas is in all of our hearts every day of the year!

DON’T FORGET TO RENEW YOUR 2012 SEASON TICKETS!
7 SHOWS ONLY $119.95
PLUS a FREE Ticket to A Christmas Carol and FREE Kids Season Tickets!
If variety is the spice of life, this is going to be one hot season! Don’t Miss It!

Amish Acres Not To Be Missed Holiday Events!

Christmas Carryout Dinner to Go
Pre-Order Thursday December 22 by 7 p.m. Pickup December 23, from 2 p.m until 7 p.m
New Year’s Eve Gala Celebration
December 31. Amish Acres signature event wraps up the Holiday Season with Family Style Threshers Dinner, the final performance of A Christmas Carol, Champagne Punch Reception, Cabaret Performance, and Fantastic Fireworks Finale over the farm’s pond at midnight!

For More Information or To Order Tickets, Call 800-800-4942 or On Line at AmishAcres.com